|

Joomla a Great CMS

URL: www.joomla.org

Marquee nonprofit clients:

Al Gore’s website
Women’s Edge Coalition
United Nations Regional Information Centre

Joomla strives for power in simplicity. Its programmers believe that anyone with a bit of technical know-how should have no problem setting up and maintaining a website. They have created a tool that is friendly, comparatively easy to get started with, and prioritizes ease of use.

Screenshot:  A website that uses Joomla in a state not too far from out-of-the-box

Screenshot: Editing this site in Joomla

Joomla is designed to work just fine in basic shared hosting environments (the least expensive, most common web hosting package). Its installer looks much like the simple installers used for common desktop software, and the administrative interface that content editors use looks much like a desktop program as well. There are few barriers to entry with Joomla, which means it should not take a web developer much time to get you up and running, and if you’re technically savvy you may be able to do it yourself.

If you need to extend Joomla in a way not covered by its extensions—which happen to be beautifully documented and easy to find at extensions.joomla.org—you should not have to pay too much for a programmer, because Joomla is written in PHP, a widely-used general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for Web development.

As is usually true, this ease of getting started comes with a tradeoff. Joomla can be a great choice to build a sophisticated website with hundreds of pages, solid navigation, and common content types such as news items or events. However, it has limited out-of- the box functionality for dealing with sophisticated dynamic content structures. For instance, the site navigation is limited to no more than two levels of hierarchy, and you can only link one page to another (for a “you might also be interested in” type of structure) based on free-form page tags, rather than more rigorous metadata and rules.

The next major release of Joomla, version 1.5, should be out by year-end. This version will be a rewrite of the underlying code, in order to make it easier for programmers to extend certain functionality and organize underlying frameworks, but it is not expected to change the way that content editors interact with Joomla. Site visitors should have no idea that anything has changed.

Joomla is fully integrated with CiviCRM and integrates well with common packages like DemocracyInAction and GetActive.


Windows Is Not A Virus

This morning while I was surfing the web I found this post that I want to share with you.

No, Windows is not a virus. Here’s what viruses do:

  • They replicate quickly - okay, Windows does that.
  • Viruses use up valuable system resources, slowing down the system as they do so - okay, Windows does that.
  • Viruses will, from time to time, trash your hard disk - okay, Windows does that too.
  • Viruses are usually carried, unknown to the user, along with valuable programs and systems. Sigh… Windows does that, too.
  • Viruses will occasionally make the user suspect their system is too slow (see 2) and the user will buy new hardware. Yup, that’s with Windows, too.

Until now it seems Windows is a virus but there are fundamental differences: Viruses are well supported by their authors, are running on most systems, their program code is fast, compact and efficient and they tend to become more sophisticated as they mature.

So Windows is not a virus.

It’s a bug.

What do you think?…

Original post you can find it here.


Recover Your Lost Files

JFileRecovery is a free Java Web Start application that can copy files from damaged storage devices and media, skipping over problematic regions that typically cause copying to fail. If the file is listed, there is a good chance that JFileRecovery can salvage much of the data with minimal corruption. For many media files such as MP3, MPEG, AVI and JPEG, corruption is often not even noticeable.

Copying large video files from scratched CDs and DVDs often results in CRC errors, aborting the process and making transferring the file impossible. JFileRecovery can bypass these CRC errors, with minimal data loss which may only be noticeable as a single bad frame in the video.

What is a CRC Error?

A cyclic redundancy check (CRC) is used to detect alteration of data during transmission or storage. This checking procedure is useful to identify when data is damaged or corrupted.

The most common time you will see a CRC error message is when trying to read data from a damaged CD or DVD. Usually the computer becomes less responsive and you hear repetitive seek noises from the drive for up to a minute. And then, if you are using windows XP, you will encounter the following error message:

Cannot copy [FILENAME]. Data error (cyclic redundancy check)

The copy process is then aborted with no option of retrying to read from the damaged region or skipping over it. This is very frustrating when copying large files because you must try copying again from the beginning.

JFileRecovery provides options to retry or skip bad sectors when copying files from damaged hard drives, CDs, DVDs and Flash media.

Download it from here.